Pinning

Models and Toys Related to Five Star Stories

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errol

Pinning

Post by errol » Mon Feb 07, 2005 2:43 pm

I was about to start pinning my first model and I was wondering if anybody out there had any advice before I started. I was wondering what the best angles for legs and arms and what joints to glue and which ones not to glue to make painting easier. I noticed that people are calling sheizzel the pinning master. I have experience building models but have never really tried resin and have been in love with mortor heads and am looking forward to starting a serios collection. I just got into a new house and I am trying to add to my new house decor. I have mechs form other series(robotech,transformer,gundam)but with out a doubt FSS has the freshest. So I am trying to bring some balance by showcasing some brilliant FSS designs. I would like to thank in advance anyone who responds. Long live FSS.

Akuma Sephitaro

Post by Akuma Sephitaro » Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:29 pm

All I can add is a mistake I've made plenty of times...

When pinning a round peg joint thing, use two pins so it doesn't rotate and become a huge pain in the end... (What my 1/144 KOG suffers from, but there wasn't really room for two pins.... )

KOG
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Re: Pinning

Post by KOG » Tue Feb 08, 2005 6:19 pm

errol wrote:I was about to start pinning my first model and I was wondering if anybody out there had any advice before I started. I was wondering what the best angles for legs and arms and what joints to glue and which ones not to glue to make painting easier.
This is going to depend entirely on what kit you are building. There's not going to be any universal formula for what order you should paint and build the parts in.
A few general guidelines:
1) when in doubt, pin. Skimping on the pins will leave you a headache later, guaranteed.
2) for back-heavy kits, angle the legs a little backward at the hip, so that the center of gravity of the kit remains above the feet.
3) when building a poseable resin FSS kit... it's generally a good idea to just convert it to a fixed pose stance. Again, it saves headaches later.

I noticed that people are calling sheizzel the pinning master.
That is just a little joke around here. Since he spends a lot of time pinning and test-fitting his kits, but hasn't actually gotten any painted and completed yet.

elemental

Post by elemental » Wed Feb 09, 2005 8:25 am

Another obvious tip: try not to drill so deep that you drill right through the part. :oops:

Also, a snugly fitting pin can be a substitute for actually gluing the parts together. I only glue when absolutely essential, so that my models can be almost entirely taken apart. Transport, repairs or repainting is easier that way.

errol

Post by errol » Sun Feb 13, 2005 3:05 am

Thank you guys for the help. I've been searching around the net and ran across some info about using paper clips for pinning instead of brass pins. Are ther any cons to doing it this way? I have some paper clips but am having a hard time finding a small enough drill bit for my dremel at my local hardware stores,Lowes and HD . I think I'm going to have to go to specialty tool store. If any body has any helpfull tips or potholes to avoid, please let me know. And oh my god Chi-town is full of hotties.

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Sheizzel
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Post by Sheizzel » Sun Feb 13, 2005 3:52 am

Paper clips or brass rods are no different when using them for pinning.

As for drill bits, you might want to get a drill bit set like the one made by Tamiya http://www.hlj.com/product/TAM74049 . 1-3mm is bascially all you'll need for a MH kits.

bkito

Post by bkito » Mon Feb 14, 2005 11:10 am

I found a dremel brand set of drill bits that has 5 or six drill bits ranging in size from smaller than paperclip, to clothes-hanger sized. I beleive I found it at either Home Depot or at Wal-Mart. Good luck with the pinning!

BK

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