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Models and Toys Related to Five Star Stories

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FSS is totally emo

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Post by FSS is totally emo » Tue Dec 07, 2004 3:03 am

i want to get into FSS modeling, but its so confusing, go plastic, resin, vinyl, ???????????????
im a seasoned gundam builder with 16 master grades (and endless other smaller scale models, HGUC, etc) under my belt and several reasonably good-looking kitbashed self-mods, so what would be a good starting point for a FSS model? (the 1/100 JAGD Mirage is pretty sweet, eh? for its $450 price!!!)

i would like to build most any MH except a Boowray (what an ugly POS) or a Flame Empress (too weird)

cobywan
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Post by cobywan » Tue Dec 07, 2004 7:27 am

If you think that any of the FSS designs are too wierd or ugly then it is not for you!

Actually one of the Wave 1/144th scale LED Mirage kits might be right up your alley. They build like the Bandai kits but still need to be painted. After that just jump into resin.

But it is sounding like it is a little late in the game to get into FSS kits with the talk of Volks getting out of the garage kit industry.

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Post by sarion » Tue Dec 07, 2004 1:40 pm

cobywan wrote:But it is sounding like it is a little late in the game to get into FSS kits with the talk of Volks getting out of the garage kit industry.
still time to get the originals at HLJ rite?
but $450 for the Jagd? i wish they were still in production (recast :P )

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Re: first

Post by hitori » Tue Dec 07, 2004 3:12 pm

FSS is totally emo wrote:i want to get into FSS modeling, but its so confusing, go plastic, resin, vinyl, ???????????????
im a seasoned gundam builder with 16 master grades (and endless other smaller scale models, HGUC, etc) under my belt and several reasonably good-looking kitbashed self-mods, so what would be a good starting point for a FSS model? (the 1/100 JAGD Mirage is pretty sweet, eh? for its $450 price!!!)

i would like to build most any MH except a Boowray (what an ugly POS) or a Flame Empress (too weird)
If you want to get in to FSS modeling, try your hands on any of the Mighty series.
These are recent kits with good engineering and there aren't too many parts.
They look great when finished, too. :D

But if you are calling yourself a seasoned modeler just with a few MG kits, FSS modeling might not be for you.
Bandai's models, especially the MG line and up are technical marvels.
It makes any novice create fantastic looking robots with minimal effort while having fun!

The pieces snap together perfectly, the molds are crisp, and the quality is consistent.
But most of the good FSS kits are resin type.
What is more, since the "original manufacturer" kits are so expensive and hard to come by, most modelers settle for "recasts."

Although the quality of recast kits have improved drastically, they are still somewhat inconsistent.
And because of the inherent characteristics of the manufacturing process of soft-mold resin casting, not all kits turn out perfect.
You'll have to grind and drill, sometimes sculpt some parts to make it work.
So building resin models require lots more skill, tools and time to complete.

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Post by KOG » Tue Dec 07, 2004 5:38 pm

I'd probably start with a Wave 1/144 LED to get familiar with the intricacy, detailing, and painting style needed to make a FSS kit look good. Once comfortable with that, start with a simpler resin to get familiar with the methods for preparing resin parts, and the methods for construction (pinning and etc.). Once the building basics are mastered on a simpler kit, feel free to get any resin and just be prepared to spend the time and effort it requires.

I'd recommend avoiding any of the poseable resins as a first resin. I think older SSS and newer SAV kits from Volks are good to start on, since the construction is all very straightforward 'peg A into slot B' type of stuff. WSC kits and some others that use that pesky 'free pose' system require a bit more finesse.

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Post by Hydra Mirage » Tue Dec 07, 2004 6:34 pm

How necessary is pinning ?
Wouldn't a strong glue be sufficient ?
I don't want to start drilling my models (I don't even have a drill)

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Post by KOG » Tue Dec 07, 2004 6:56 pm

From personal experience, pinning is VITAL to the long term health and stability of your kit. I tried to build my first couple kits with epoxy only, and even though the glue is very good, parts still became loose and/or detached over time. Many glues work by fusing one part to another (plastic glue works this way), but this is not so with resin building.

I later had to go back and rebuild my old kits, using pins this time.

The larger the kit, and the more weight a join will hold, the more important it is to pin.

If you're going to get into resin building, a drill is a MUST. However, a hand powered drill (aka pin vise) is often sufficient for building small and mid size kits. A power drill is needed for large pins on the largest kits, and larger bits are also needed to prepare for installation of joints on MM kits.
Hydra Mirage wrote:How necessary is pinning ?
Wouldn't a strong glue be sufficient ?
I don't want to start drilling my models (I don't even have a drill)

WayS'Lo'

Post by WayS'Lo' » Tue Dec 07, 2004 7:06 pm

I have a pin vice... what kind of 'larger' kit would need a power drill? Surely i wouldnt need it for something as lithe as the Yen Xing right? ( in the post now! YAY!) Of the 1 or 2 resin kits ive made glue was good enough...

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Post by John F. Moscato » Tue Dec 07, 2004 7:11 pm

I wouldn't even TOUCH resin kits of any kind without at the very least a pin-vise and dremel. Pin vise is fine for smaller holes (up to about 1.5mm dia) and that don't have to be too deep. For 1/100 kits especially, I prefer a dremel or a power drill, since you need to make the pinning holes deep enough to get a good hold on the part; especially in the crotch/knee/ankles, where the stress is the greatest.

Granted, you can still drill out the holes by hand if you REALLY have to, but you'll be in absolute pain by the end of the day, hence the Dremel's usefulness.
John F. Moscato

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Post by KOG » Tue Dec 07, 2004 7:16 pm

Larger pins (and larger drill bits) are needed on pretty much any large scale kit. Your 1/35s, 1/48s, and probably most 1/72s... I reckon a large pin is good for any join that calls for one massive part to attach to another massive part and then bear a good deal of weight.

I doubt Yen Xing would have much call for large pins.
WayS'Lo' wrote:I have a pin vice... what kind of 'larger' kit would need a power drill? Surely i wouldnt need it for something as lithe as the Yen Xing right? ( in the post now! YAY!) Of the 1 or 2 resin kits ive made glue was good enough...

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Post by KOG » Tue Dec 07, 2004 7:18 pm

I stick with pin vise when I can for the moment, mostlt because I don't have a good tool for cutting the thicker pins to size.

John, can you recommend a good (but not overly expensive) tool for cutting those large pins? Note that I don't have a garage or workshop, so I would need a simple, small, quiet tool that I can use within the confines of an apartment.

John F. Moscato wrote:I wouldn't even TOUCH resin kits of any kind without at the very least a pin-vise and dremel. Pin vise is fine for smaller holes (up to about 1.5mm dia) and that don't have to be too deep. For 1/100 kits especially, I prefer a dremel or a power drill, since you need to make the pinning holes deep enough to get a good hold on the part; especially in the crotch/knee/ankles, where the stress is the greatest.

Granted, you can still drill out the holes by hand if you REALLY have to, but you'll be in absolute pain by the end of the day, hence the Dremel's usefulness.

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Post by John F. Moscato » Tue Dec 07, 2004 7:34 pm

Hi KOG.

I use a lathe myself, but if you're using brass, you can cut those with a really good pair of cutters...Readily available at any hardware store. A dremel with the cutting wheel will also work, but produces a lot of metal dust. I'd also recommend a vise to hold parts in whilst you cut them for safety's sake. These are also available from any hardware/home renovation center, or better yet, you can probably find a really good one at a garage sale for a fraction of the price.
John F. Moscato

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Post by KOG » Tue Dec 07, 2004 7:57 pm

Thanks for the helpful info. :)

I do indeed stick with brass. And I'm not working on any massive kits yet (my G system Jagd won't be touched for a good long while) so I shouldn't need any truly large pins for a while. I guess I'll drop by Orchard Supply or Home Depot soon and check for a suitable cutter.

John F. Moscato wrote:Hi KOG.

I use a lathe myself, but if you're using brass, you can cut those with a really good pair of cutters...Readily available at any hardware store. A dremel with the cutting wheel will also work, but produces a lot of metal dust. I'd also recommend a vise to hold parts in whilst you cut them for safety's sake. These are also available from any hardware/home renovation center, or better yet, you can probably find a really good one at a garage sale for a fraction of the price.

FSS is totally emo

Post by FSS is totally emo » Wed Dec 08, 2004 1:11 am

well, thanks for all the advice, and yeah, i asked around and the FSS kits are way different than anything bandai makes- but i heard they do use polycaps sometimes (true? false?). i dont know if i have the time necessary to do FSS resin modeling (with school, work, being in a band, and whatnot), but I do have two WAVE plastic kits coming in the mail- a KOG and a LED Mirage.

FSS is totally emo

Post by FSS is totally emo » Wed Dec 08, 2004 1:12 am

cobywan wrote:If you think that any of the FSS designs are too wierd or ugly then it is not for you!

.
actually, i LOVE every other design and FSS is my fav manga. its just that the Boowray and Flame Empress dont tickle my mecha fancy.

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