Iron Man

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Mr March
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Iron Man

Post by Mr March » Sun May 04, 2008 5:43 am

Iron Man (2008)
Genre: Live Action Film – Action Adventure


This summer movie season starts with a surprisingly strong comic book adaptation from director Jon Favreau and starring the unlikely Robert Downey Jr. in the lead role. This time Marvel Studios offers up one of their lesser known super heroes but like his namesake Iron Man is a near bulletproof film that leaves recent offerings from bigger superheroes like Spider Man and Superman coughing on his contrails.

Robert Downey Jr. stars as Tony Stark, unscrupulous weapons manufacturer and charming billionaire ladies man. Stark runs afoul of terrorists armed with his own goods during a sale in Afghanistan, who then kidnap Stark and force him to build more weapons. With help from fellow captive Yinsen (Shaun Toub), Stark builds a crude armored suit to escape, but Yinsen dies aiding him. Once safely back home, Stark becomes a changed man and has a mind to refine his armored suit for more noble purposes, but neither his witty assistant Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow) nor his executive partner Obadiah Stane (Jeff Bridges) are happy with the consequences of Stark’s new found conscience.

Iron Man may not be the smartest or most believable super hero film ever made, but it’s easily one of the finest. Director Jon Favreau was wise indeed to rely heavily upon a well-paced script, gut-pleasing humor and a strong lead to position his comic book film far above the competition. The special effects are well-crafted rather than innovative and it is this diligent filmmaking appearing in all aspects of the production that ultimately makes Iron Man a success. The film can feel a bit predictable and a little contrived at times, but who even cares when a movie is this much fun?

Fortunately, Iron Man also benefits from a lead as finely crafted as the mechanical suit itself. Robert Downey Jr. completely owns his role as Tony Stark, aggressively devouring the moral repulsiveness of the character as equally as he does Stark’s drive and professionalism. The charm and humor of Downey’s Stark draw us into what is an initially despicable character, but it is the unapologetic ambition of Stark that allows the audience to appreciate his flaws that in turn prove to be virtues. Helping Downey along the way is an impressive cast of actors that all add strong performances in each role, including a lovable turn from Terrence Howard as Jim Rhodes (and a not-so-subtle nod to Rhode's future role as War Machine). The film remains a wonderful thrill ride with plenty of laughs from start to finish and is never dull despite running a little over two hours.

Rating: 4 out of 5. While Iron Man sometimes offers what we’ve seen before, it offers what it has with a proficiency few films have dared attempt. Within that small group of the best cinematic super hero adventures, Iron Man is proudly counted among them

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Post by Tachyon » Thu Jun 05, 2008 9:00 pm

I finally had a chance to see this movie. The Iron Man suit as well as several plot points in the movie were too hard for me to swallow but considering it comes from a Marvel comic book, I guess I can't be too critical.

Over all I'd say it was a good movie. Didn't get me excited, though.
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Post by 2000YearsOldMan » Mon Jun 09, 2008 7:36 pm

The movie was no bad, but I am dispoint on the ending.
I hope will see the giant iron man fighting giant robot on next one. :D
original gundam series rule.
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Post by Grebo Guru » Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:12 pm

WHO ARE YOU PEOPLE?!?

:-)

Sorry, just kidding. But all the same, I loved this movie. My favorite movie of the year. I may be biased because I've been collecting the comic for 30 years, but almost everyone I know loved it too. I saw it in the theaters three times.

I gotta know -- what's not to like? Heck, what's not to love? I thought it was one of those rare gems: a perfect movie. There are very few others. ("Blade Runner", "Fight Club" and "The Piano" come to mind.)

So tell me folks, why the non-love?
"Civilize the mind, make savage the body." - M.T.T.

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Post by Tachyon » Mon Aug 11, 2008 3:13 pm

I liked the movie. I'm certainly not going to heap abuse on it. There were some things about it that weren't for me so it's hard for me to get real excited about it but I can't say it's a bad movie.

I tend to be quite picky in general when it comes to movies and books so don't let my comments turn you off of anything. Since you asked, the things about the movie I didn't like were:

:arrow: I've never felt good about the Iron Man suit concept, whether in the comic books or the movie. The technology to get that kind of weaponry, flight ability and protection into a suit that small (with only 1 person designing, building and maintaining it) belongs to a level of technology that is so very advanced that it's beyond most far-future sci-fi that we've come across. I remember as a kid seeing schematic drawings from the pages of Marvel Comics that show powerful thrusters in the feet only a few inches in diameter and only an inch or so in length. Plus, how do you control your movement? I realize most people would consider me obsessive over minor details. From my point of view, we should suspend our disbelief for good stories but for me, some disbelief is very difficult to suspend.

:arrow: In the movie, Stark's company is selling weapons designed for U.S. government contracts to the Taliban in Afghanistan (a very Hollywood, un-Islamic Taliban). That's too much for me to accept. Companies with government military contracts are watched too closely to go selling weapons to third party customers.

:arrow: The arch villain at the end jumps into a prototype suit and decides to kick some butt himself. A rich, old, schemer with a lot to lose is going to enter combat and risk his neck? It seemed implausible and out of character at the same time.

:arrow: After Tony Stark returns to the U.S. after being a prisoner he keeps the tiny powerplant in his chest and we don't hear anything about surgery to remove the metal shards. Now, I'm assuming he kept the device in his chest so that he could separate the power source from the Iron Man suit making the metal suit impossible to steal. If that's the case, it should have been explained to the audience. Also, why not have the metal pieces removed? Why risk trouble in the future? Plus, the mini powerplant in his chest acts as a magnet to pull enough to keep the metal shards from reaching his heart, right? Wouldn't walking around, day after day, with a magnet inside him mess up his computers and machinery?

Hey, I realize I'm being picky. Don't let me spoil anyone's fun. It was a fun movie to watch and I'm glad everyone else enjoyed it.

Good Points:
Robert Downey Jr. was fun to watch. The scene towards the beginning where he lightens up the mood with the soldiers in the vehicle was priceless. I was never a fan of Gwyneth Paltrow but I liked watching her in this movie. I liked all the actors.

The action and special effects were phenominal. Simply great. I hope we see more like it in the future.
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Post by Grebo Guru » Mon Aug 11, 2008 10:33 pm

Interesting points about the movie, Tachyon. Just so we're on the same page, I too am pretty picky about my movies. Perhaps in a different way than you, but still, I am a discerning moviegoer. And, as 30-year Iron Man fan, I was looking at the movie with a VERY critical eye. Anyway, perhaps I can shed some light on the matters which bothered you:

1. The extremely high tech level:
This is not a sci-fi movie, this is a SUPERHERO movie. Tony is an ultra-ultra-ultra-genius; his "superpower" is his amazing brain. The reason the IM suit is beyond our conceivable level of technology is because it uses SUPERtech -- derived from super-genius. Remember, Iron Man exists in the same universe as Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Hulk, and Thor. Expecting the movie to adhere to realistic science is... misguided. :-)

2. Stark Industries selling arms to the Taliban:
First of all, that wasn't the Taliban: it was The Ten Rings, an internationally-staffed terrorist organization led by the bald-headed dude. The organization and the man are a reference to The Mandarin, Iron Man's purported nemesis (I'm no fan of the Mandarin, but oh well). The Mandarin wears ten rings of power, you see. So, not the Taliban. Second, Stark International was not selling these arms to The Ten Rings; Obadaiah Stane himself was selling these weapons, secretly, to The Ten Rings. He was doing it illegally, in order to get The Ten Rings to kill Tony for him. I'm sure there was a good cover for it, so that the government couldn't figure this out easily, but the movie (wisely) didn't bother with such minutiae.

3. Obadiah Stane goes into battle himself:
Pepper had just gotten away with evidence of what Stane was up to. Stane was aware of this, and he saw her leave with the SHIELD agent, so he KNEW he was busted. The only option left to him was to do in the SHIELD agents and Pepper and get the hell out of there. His best option for an "emergency escape device" was the Iron Monger mech. In other words, no -- Stane had nothing left to lose. The gig was up.

4. Tony keeps the Arc Generator implanted:
What may not have been communicated very well is that the remaining shrapnel could NOT be removed; it was inoperable. The only way for Tony to live on was to keep the device in his chest; its electromagnet keeps the shrapnel in place so that it does not go any deeper into his heart and organs. Also, keeping the Arc Generator in his body ensures that it does not fall into the wrong hands -- such as Stane's. That it keeps the armor securely in his control is an added bonus. As for the magnet damaging electronics nearby, I doubt it. Carry a magnet around in your shirt pocket and I doubt you'll affect computers much. Even if you do, its entirely possible that the device is properly shielded to prevent that.

Yes, you are being picky. But it's understandable; some of these fine details did not get thoroughly explained in the film. I liked that the movie did not treat its audience like dummies, but at the same time the film may have taken that a tiny bit too far; it moved fast and did not "sweat the small stuff," even when perhaps it should have. Hard to know what was written, filmed, and ended up on the cutting room floor. The special edition 2-disc set may shed some light on this.

Did you see The Incredible Hulk? Tony made a nice cameo at the end, just as Nick Fury made a cameo at the end of Iron Man. They're building up to the Avengers movie which is on the horizon. It's gonna be quite an experience... :-)
"Civilize the mind, make savage the body." - M.T.T.

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