Anyone use brushes for painting models?

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Tachyon
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Anyone use brushes for painting models?

Post by Tachyon » Tue Feb 18, 2003 10:25 pm

I know people use brushes for painting lead miniatures but what about plastic models? It seems all I hear about is airbrushes for painting plastic models these days. What about you guys?
If you don't like the news then go make some of your own.

Lurker

Post by Lurker » Tue Jul 29, 2003 4:12 am

Paint brushs can be messier then spray paint, which is why I stick to Spraying. It's cleaner and easier to manage as well. Brushes I use for extremly small areas only.

bmyers13

Post by bmyers13 » Fri Aug 01, 2003 1:15 am

I don't do a whole lot of modeling but when i do i use a brush. It works pretty good, i'm sure it takes longer than using an air brush but i don't build enough kits to warrant buying a good air brush system.

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Post by Tachyon » Fri Aug 01, 2003 2:06 am

How many kits do you guys build on average? One a month? One every 2 months?
If you don't like the news then go make some of your own.

Lurker

Post by Lurker » Fri Aug 01, 2003 3:53 am

I myself usually build 2-3 a month if I'm lucky, mostly one a month. I do mostly master grade kits now anyways, so it's not as cheap as with 1/144s, and obvisouly much more tiem consuming.

Harlan Rosen

Re: Anyone use brushes for painting models?

Post by Harlan Rosen » Fri Aug 01, 2003 8:11 am

Tachyon wrote:I know people use brushes for painting lead miniatures but what about plastic models? It seems all I hear about is airbrushes for painting plastic models these days. What about you guys?
Many modellers are quick to extol the values of the airbrush. The airbrush's strengths are that they paint very quickly and leave a smooth, even surface. Unfortunately, a good airbrush (and not the 20 dollar Testors packs that're glorified spraycans) can cost a lot of money and using airbrushes takes quite a bit of time to properly master. Airbrushes are also quite messy: you'll not only need to thin your paint before you can spray it, but you'll also have to properly clean your airbrush after you use it. Pre-spray and post-spray can be a pretty time consuming adventure that can sometimes offset the quickness of painting.

So when do I use an airbrush? When I'm on a large project that uses multiple pieces of one color. It's very easy for me to set the individual pieces up, give them a once or two-over with the airbrush and move on. For example, assembling and painting the MS-09 Dom from Bandai's Master Grade series is an excellent candidate for an airbrushing. The armor pieces of this kit have large surface areas and little detailing (thus, I don't have to worry about the paint obscuring very fine details).

I always like my trusty paintbrush. Even if I airbrush something, I'm going to end up handbrushing as well. Paintbrushing is the easiest, cheapest, less-hassle way of getting your model done. Paintbrushing requires very little setting up and cleaning up (especially if you use acrylics) and is the best thing for anyone new to modelling. Of course, there are drawbacks to paintbrushing are pretty straightforward: having to paint multiple coats for a strong color, not getting even paint coverage, and ending up with brush streaks. But hey, you might like the extra bit of character that a brush streak brings. :)


Cheers,

Nimrod

Post by Nimrod » Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:26 pm

I'm a hand brusher and while I may get "poo poo" upon by the so called "experts" I find using the brush gives me more control and leeway with the painting of my various model kits.

I find it's also easier to fix a mistake if I paint my hand over using an airbrush.

machine mess

Post by machine mess » Thu Jun 07, 2007 4:22 pm

If you thin your paint properly - I use a drop or two of Mr. Retarder in the mix since I paint with lacquers - when you hand brush it helps the paint dry slower and the brush strokes level out. There is also a product called Mr. Levelling Thinner which I believe does the a simliar thing though I have never used it myself - I don't know it it is for lacquers or acrylics.
I think Tamiya acrylics cure/dry slowly enough that they are self-leveling, but I have had really bad luck trying to get even coats on large areas with hand-brushed acryl.

For years I did all my kits with a bristle brush and only in the last year or so have I gotten into airbrushing.

Metallic paints are really tough to hand brush, in my experience. They have a mix of pigments and particles that just doesn't flow out smoothly with hand brushing. I used to do metallics from cans, but now I spray some from the can onto a little dish and then add thinner and pour it into my airbrush for better control. I'll get some of those Alclad II metallics one of these days.

Overall I'd say AB is best for metallics and large areas, while handbrushing is better for small areas and tiny details.

Hellric

Post by Hellric » Tue Sep 04, 2007 2:12 pm

I always use acrylic paints from Games Workshop and Vallejo + acrylic medium to help blending as slow down the drying. I also use inks (paint diluted in water + a little of product to do the washing-up) or premade inks from Games Workshop.
I use good brushes, Kolinski sable, from Winsor & Newton or Raphael.

yanfeng

Re: Anyone use brushes for painting models?

Post by yanfeng » Tue Jun 07, 2011 3:00 am

SUpport the post.

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Re: Anyone use brushes for painting models?

Post by Poseidal » Fri Oct 21, 2011 10:29 am

I haven't done much mecha models recently, as I mostly do miniatures but I generally hand brush even the larger vehicles. I do have an airbrush but it's not a very good one; I might get one sometime along the line.

I generally use GW or Vallejo, more of the latter and less of the former now. I think down and apply a few layers until it's reasonable even.

Example from reasonably recently:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4109/543 ... d1bab5.jpg
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5218/544 ... c1c96a.jpg
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5094/544 ... 495a0c.jpg

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